Thursday, June 16, 2011

Sushi

Hello, friends! Konbanwa. :D


This time I'm gonna talk about SUSHI! Why sushi? Because I remembered the first time I eat sushi with my boyfriend, and it was fun! :D Because at that time it was our first time to eat sushi, we face so many difficulties. And it was a funny moment! :D


Although it was our first time to eat sushi, we knew several types of sushi that we ate. We ordered a package that contains any kinds of sushi. I like salmon sushi so much, because it feels like melted in the mouth. But i don't like squid sushi. It was too chewy and hard to swallow. :P


Back to sushi. Sushi is a food of Japanese origin consisting of cooked vinegared rice (shari) combined with other ingredients (neta). Neta and forms of sushi presentation vary, but the ingredient which all sushi have in common is shari. The most common neta is seafood. And here, I wanna talk about any kinds of sushi. For you who don't know about types of sushi, you'd better check this out!


Makizushi
Makizushi, Norimaki, or Makimono is a cylindrical piece, formed with the help of a bamboo mat, called a makisu. Makizushi is generally wrapped in nori, but can occasionally be found wrapped in a thin omelette, soy paper, cucumber, or parsley. Makizushi is usually cut into six or eight pieces, which constitutes a single roll order.

Nigirizushi
Nigirizushi consists of an oblong mound of sushi rice that the chef presses into a small rectangular box between the palms of the hands, usually with a bit of wasabi, and a topping (the neta) draped over it. Neta are typically fish such as salmon, tuna or other seafood. Certain toppings are typically bound to the rice with a thin strip of nori, most commonly octopus (tako), freshwater eel (unagi), sea eel (anago), squid (ika), and sweet egg (tamago). When ordered separately, nigiri is generally served in pairs. A sushi set (a sampler dish) may contain only one piece of each topping.

Chirashizushi
Chirashizushi is a bowl of sushi rice topped with a variety of sashimi and garnishes (also refers to barazushi). Edomae chirashizushi (Edo-style scattered sushi) is an uncooked ingredient that is arranged artfully on top of the sushi rice in a bowl. Gomokuzushi (Kansai-style sushi) are cooked or uncooked ingredients mixed in the body of rice in a bowl. There is no set formula for the ingredients and they are either chef's choice or sometimes specified by the customer. It is commonly eaten because it is filling, fast and easy to make. Chirashizushi often varies regionally. It is eaten annually on Hinamatsuri in March.

Inarizushi
Inarizushi is a pouch of fried tofu filled with usually just sushi rice. It is named after the Shinto god Inariwho is believed to have a fondness for fried tofu. The pouch is normally fashioned as deep-fried tofu. Regional variations include pouches made of a thin omelette. It should not be confused with inari maki, which is a roll filled with flavored fried tofu. A very large version, sweeter than normal and often containing bits of carrot, is popular in Hawaii, where it is called "cone sushi".

Hakozushi (Oshizushi)
Oshizushi, also known as hako-zushi, is a pressed sushi from the Kansai Region, a favourite and specialty of Osaka. A block-shaped piece formed using a wooden mold, called an oshibako. The chef lines the bottom of the oshibako with the toppings, covers them with sushi rice, and then presses the lid of the mold down to create a compact, rectilinear block. The block is removed from the mold and then cut into bite-sized pieces. Particularly famous is battera or saba zushi.

Temakizushi
Temaki is a large cone-shaped piece of nori on the outside and the ingredients spilling out the wide end. A typical temaki is about ten centimeters (4 in) long, and is eaten with fingers because it is too awkward to pick it up with chopsticks. For optimal taste and texture,Temaki must be eaten quickly after being made because the nori cone soon absorbs moisture from the filling and loses its crispness and becomes somewhat difficult to bite.

Narezushi
Narezushi is a traditional form of fermented sushi. Skinned and gutted fish are stuffed with salt, placed in a wooden barrel, doused with salt again, then weighed down with a heavy tsukemonoishi (pickling stone). As days pass, water seeps out and is removed. After six months this funazushi can be eaten, remaining edible for another six months or more.

Gunkanzushi
Small cups made of sushi rice and dried seaweed filled with seafood, etc. There are countless varieties of gunkanzushi, some of the most common ones being sea urchin and various kinds of fish eggs.

So, interested to try sushi? I bet you do:D

Good night, friends! See you on the next post! *kisses*

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